Information about Governors

What do governors do?

Governors represent the interests of Trust members and hold the Non-Executive Directors to account for the performance of the Board of Directors.  EPUT is committed to having a diverse Council of Governors that is representative of the communities we serve.

The Council of Governors is a key part of a ‘can do’ organisation and acts as a link between the Trust’s members and the Board of Directors. Together, the Board and Council ‘drive’ the Trust ensuring that we provide quality services and the highest standards of care.

Governors have no operational influence and are not about ‘rubber stamping’ decisions made by the Board of Directors.  The Council advises the Board of public opinion and acts as guardians of the public interest.  Public Governors develop links between their local community and EPUT.  This will ensure we remain rooted in and responsive to our communities’ needs.

Elected staff Governors represent their staff group on the Council and play a vital role in sharing information about the way the Trust is developing and in the delivery of high quality and safe patient care.

Governors also act as ambassadors and champions of the Trust, helping to promote the work of the Trust and helping to tackle the stigma associated with any of the services we provide.

What are the benefits of being a Governor?

  •  Ability to influence the Trust’s future direction and services
  • Opportunity to feedback information from members and communities
  • Opportunity to build relationships within the Trust
  • Opportunity to raise the Trust’s profile
  • Get involved in the health decisions within your Trust
  • Great learning and development opportunities

How often do Governors meet?

The Council of Governors meets a minimum of four times a year usually in February, May, August and November. Governors are also expected to attend the Annual Members Meeting held in the autumn as well as attending some training and development events so that they are kept up to date with what is happening in the NHS and can learn more about their role.

There are also sub-committee, working groups and public/member events that Governors are encouraged to become involved with.  The time commitment will therefore vary depending on how involved you decide to become.  Typically you might expect to commit up to two to three days per month which includes meetings, events, training and reading, etc.

What skills do I need?

We aim to have governors who are representative of all walks of life; you don’t need special skills to become an effective governor: you need to be passionate about the NHS, care about your local services, and wish to represent the views of local people in your community, and most importantly have the time to do so. We will provide training for the successful candidate and support to help you carry out your role.

How often do governors meet?

The Council of Governors meets four times a year and Governors are also expected to attend the Annual Members Meeting (AMM) as well as attending some training events so that they are kept up to date with what is happening in the NHS and can learn more about their role. There are also sub-committee, working groups and public/member events that governors can become involved. The time commitment will therefore vary depending on how involved you decide to become. Typically you might expect to commit up to two to three days per month which includes meetings, events, training and reading, etc.

Who can become a governor?

To be able to stand for election you must:

  • Be a member of the Trust in the constituency for which you wish to be elected
  • Be 16 years or older
  • Agree to carry out your duties if elected as a Governor
  • Have read the disqualification criteria and made sure that none of them apply to you (see Trust’s constitution)
  • Complete and return your nomination form, election statement and photograph by 5pm on Monday 8 May 2017.

Only members of our Trust may become elected governors and must be aged 16 or over at the nomination date. You must also belong to one of the constituencies/ groups where there is a vacancy. A list of exclusions is included in the Trust’s constitution.

What skills do I need?

We aim to have Governors who are representative of all walks of life; you don’t need special skills to become an effective Governor: you need to be passionate about the NHS, care about your local services, and wish to represent the views of local people in your community, and most importantly have the time to do so. We will provide training for the successful candidate and support to help you carry out your role.

Further information about being a governor can also be found by clicking the links below: